Teaching Letters to Dyslexics

Recently I was blogging about how using an image of a “person, place, thing or animal”  to represent a letter of the alphabet was confusing for a dyslexic child trying to memorize and print letters.

Often you will notice in classrooms or workbooks that a picture of an animal or object is used to help the child learn what a letter stands for.  This can create a problem for a student because they can end up thinking  the picture with the letter represents what  the letter is.  Then when they are  trying to put the letters in a word together they are seeing a jumble of animals or objects in their minds connected to the letters.  This can completely confuse them when trying to understand that letters are symbols and when placed in a specific order represent a word in our language.

I came across this clipart above and found it to be a perfect example of how this teaching method can be so devastating to a dyslexic child trying to learn to spell.  If a dyslexic child memorizes this image and statement “F is for FROG who lives in a pond” then to them an “F” is a frog who is living in a pond.   Every time from that point forward when they see an “F” they will imagine a frog!

A better way to help them learn their letters is to have them print or “draw”  the images of the letters several times and say the name of the letter out loud as they print.  You should always have an image of the letters in front of them as they are practicing.  This helps to stimulate memory because you are using the visual, auditory and kinesthetic .  Dyslexics often have trouble with drawing the letters neatly so start with a practice sheet with dotted letters to trace.  Then use a sheet with a single letter printed on each line for them to copy and leaving room to draw them several times.   Take a look at a portion of an example:

You can download a free full set of copies in a pdf format for the Upper and Lower Case Letters at this link:

Alphabet Practice Sheets for Dyslexics

Then begin to introduce sight reading which is learning a whole word as an image for the word.   Have the student practice drawing the whole word and saying its name so they learn that a specific sequence of  letters  represents  a specific word.  For example, take the word “Frog” to practice with.  Print the word on a piece of paper in large black letters and then have the student practice printing it several times.  As they are printing it have them say the word out loud each time.  This process  of  using the three senses (visual, auditory and kinesthetic) again will help them memorize the image of the word so they are more able to spell the word on their own and identify it in a list of words or in a passage they are reading.

So a better version of the above image would be to have the word “FROG” instead of  “F” with the statement “FROG lives in a pond”.

One more consideration.  When teaching them their letters and using them in words it is always best to start with printing all capitals, then  small letters, continue on to capital letters with small letters and then finish with cursive writing.  This process should be gradual so they can make the adjustment from upper and lower case and then mixed such as capitalizing  names or the first word in a sentence. Learning these skills could take a few day or months depending on the student’s specific issues so don’t hurry.

Many dyslexics however, have a really difficult time trying to master cursive writing.  Connecting the letters together is very confusing since they learned them as separate images and joining them together is a significant departure from what they have learned initially.  If it is a real issue, rather than trying to force this form of writing on a dyslexic, let it go.  If they can learn to print and/or use a computer, that is all they need.

If you are interested in more information I have a blog entry that discusses the confusion of working  with upper and lower case letters.  Click here to check it out.  We also have lots of solutions and ideas for these issues with learning letters and spelling words on our website:  Dyslexia Victoria Online

Cheers!

Karen L Hope

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About Dyslexia Victoria Online

I have been developing and researching alternative solutions for dyslexic problems for over twenty years. The inspiration for this quest, which is what it had become, is my daughter Genevieve. She is dyslexic and after years of working at solving her problems, when she was a child, she has now overcome all of her issues and is a successful business woman, wife and mother. Today my partner, Howard deGraaf, and I are bringing our teaching methodologies through the internet to all those frustrated parents, tutors, teachers and of course, the dyslexic children and adults. Howard deGraaf, he's now my fiance, isn't Dyslexic but he is a Right Brained thinker and is a valuable asset. Just like a Dyslexic he can see the "Big Picture" and is a terrific problem solver. Many of his blog entries are observations he makes during our Dyslexia Assessments and during our Workshops and Presentations. The two of us continue to do individual assessments and we are getting many requests for presentations to teachers and Service Providers. The website continues to evolve and we are communicating with teachers and parents from all around the world. Watch for lots of changes as we continue to learn about methods and research that help individuals with Dyslexia and we get that newest information to you.
This entry was posted in ADD/ADHD, Blogroll, Dyslexia, Dyslexia in the Workplace, Education, Special Education, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Teaching Letters to Dyslexics

  1. I came across your Alphabet Practice sheets, and they were exactly what I was looking for!

    My children and I thank you.

  2. ella2001 says:

    I love this, rants and raves from the right side! How I wish I read this about letters when Gus was in kindergarten….

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