How do Dyslexics go from having a Learning Difference to a Learning Disability

When I talk to parents with children who they suspect have Dyslexia I generally hear the same story. Problems with letters, numbers, counting and words when they were four or five. They couldn’t print well but often very artistic especially for their age. Sometimes they started talking later than other children and had speech difficulties such as lisps, mispronunciation of words more than other children, couldn’t remember simple words so would say “thing-a-ma-jig”, “whatcha-ma-callit” or use the wrong word. But they were also intelligent and quick learners with other skills and knowledge such as building things with legos, athletics, art projects, singing, dancing, telling stories, remembering events or movies in extensive detail or making observations about things that is way beyond their years. They loved to learn, asked endless questions about everything and were excited about going to school.

When they enter school they continue to have problems with letters, phonics, words, numbers, arithmetic, and other linear sequential skills such as memorizing the alphabet or counting in the right order. They also have difficulties with instructions so they don’t always understand what the teacher wants. As each year passes there is less and less emphasis on singing, dancing, drawing, painting, making things and physically demonstrating all new concepts. Their excitement to be in school begins to dissolve and is replaced with frustration, confusion, fear, anger, sadness and physical distress such as headaches, stomach aches and throwing up. Their self-esteem drops and they begin to doubt themselves.

Teachers become frustrated with them not understanding what they need and their classmates start to tease them because they can’t spell or read and they print poorly.  Right brain dominant children ask the same questions over and over and when they read out loud they can take forever, mispronounce everything, and can’t sound the words out.

School becomes a scary place and they will often feign sickness to stay home. Some children will have anxiety attacks at the mere thought of going to school.

As each grade passes, their problems and anxiety deepen. Dyslexics as right brain dominant thinkers are generally very empathetic and intuitive so they become keenly aware of the distress and fear their parents are feeling for them and  the frustration or outright hostility their teachers and classmates are expressing towards them in the classroom. They get farther and farther behind the class, convinced they are stupid and eventually shut down when learning things in class they are really good at such as science, math, building things or making up a story orally.

By grade four or five their learning difference has become a learning disability and these students are can be experiencing depression and other psychological issues.  I have had several parents tell me their children were saying they wanted to kill themselves when they were in the third or fourth grade.   Junior and high school is a nightmare as the school work becomes more difficult and demanding and they don’t have the ability to read a lot of  books for their school subjects. Less and less of their schooling uses concrete real examples – the emphasis is on abstract learning and requires students to do endless worksheets, written tests, reports and essays. Little of their schoolwork requires or allows a physical demonstration of the subject (3 dimensional structures, posters, drawings, play, dance or videos),  to show understanding and knowledge – mostly writing.  Eventually these students become a large percentage of our school’s dropouts.

So can this picture be different for a Dyslexic student? Of course it can. Let’s rewind this story back to the beginning.

  • When our right brain student enters the school system the school tests them and other children  for reading readiness.  Some children, especially Dyslexics are not mature or developed enough for reading in kindergarten or grade one. When children are significantly younger than other students in their grade, a difference of six months or more in age is enough to severely affect a child being able to keep up with the class.
  • Then determine the students who learn letters, phonics, words, numbers and sequences easily (word to image thinkers or left brain dominant) from the visual students. Visual or right brain dominant thinkers are image to word thinkers. They need to learn in whole complete and concrete concepts (images)and connect them to words. Complete understanding of letters, words and numbers comes more slowly for them.

These students are then broken into classrooms that teach to these two very different groups of learners  –  classes for strong left brain learners and right brain learners. Multi-sensory, hands on physical demonstration style teaching would be high priority in both classes but mandatory for all subjects for the right brainers throughout their school years.

The right brain/dyslexic students would be given more time to learn how to spell and read utilizing teaching methods appropriate for right brain learners such as colour to learn letters, numbers and arithmetic and making letters and numbers with modelling clay
(Ron Davis – The Gift of Dyslexia).

There would be emphasis on starting with sight reading and syllables (word families) which right brain dominant students learn more easily at the beginning.

Teachers would  encourage these students to ask their questions and use stories and pictures to explain everything. They would respect their need to not just learn information in a rote manner such as the steps to solving a division problem but would prioritize making a concept real by demonstrating what division is (subtracting in groups as opposed to multiplication which is adding in groups). This can be done with groups of candy, objects, pies, etc) so they understand what division is before doing the steps. This gives the big picture and meaning behind division.

Special attention would be paid to giving extensive practice learning to print to help address Dysgraphia, a common issue for Dyslexics, screening to see if they have Irlen Syndrome (distablized text) and learning style (auditory, kinesthetic or visual). Once these issues are determined then accommodations would be put in place.

Computers would be given them in the early grades with the use of the many programs available that would help them with their schoolwork. Some teachers will say this is unfair to other students in a class who don’t have a computer. If the Dyslexic student is not able to complete school work in the same fashion as other students who don’t have problems with reading and writing then the Dyslexic student is simply “leveling the playing field”.

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There are many different ways to make a right brain dominant and Dyslexic student’s school experience successful and exciting to prepare them for their future.

For more ideas I have provided some links:
Dyslexia Victoria Online
http://www.dyslexiavictoriaonline.com

Gifted Children (Visual Spatial Learners)
http://www.gifteddevelopment.com/Visual_Spatial_Learner/vsl.htm

4D program in New Zealand
http://www.4d.org.nz/school/

Neil MacKay (noted Dyslexia expert)
http://www.actiondyslexia.co.uk/

Chat with Sally Shaywitz (another Dyslexia specialist)
http://www.greatschools.org/special-education/LD-ADHD/859-overcoming-dyslexia-a-chat.gs?page=1#2

British Dyslexia Association
http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/

Also you might want to check out the page on our website about suggested books to read:
http://www.dyslexiavictoriaonline.com/otbowere.html

And our blog is:
https://dyslexiavictoria.wordpress.com/
You can sign up to receive new blog entries on the left side of the main page of the blog at the top where it says “Email Subscription Rants and Raves from the Right Side”

Cheers!
Karey Hope deGraaf
Dyslexia Victoria Online Co-founder
Karey Hope deGraaf of Dyslexia Victoria Online

LEARNED SOMETHING NEW FROM A DYSLEXIC CHILD, AGAIN

reading and spelling is hard for a dylsexic child in grade one

Last week we did an assessment on a bright, enthusiast, polite, smiling, happy 6 year old girl. This assessment has affected me like none we have done so far.

Her parents told her teacher that they were concerned about her lack of progress with numbers, letters, colours and other seemingly simple tasks for a child her age. Lucky for her she is in a small independent school with small class sizes. Her teacher listened to the concerns of the parents and agreed that her progress was not where it should be. This teacher had heard of the work we do and contacted us to see if we could shed some light on this issue. The parents agreed to us doing an assessment on their daughter.

We met her early in the morning at her school and were introduced to her by her Mom and younger brother. Like we always do with our assessments we assured her that this was not a test and there were no right or wrong answers, we were just there to see what she was good at and what she needed help with. We did our regular testing procedures with letters, colours, numbers, cause and effect, word families, etc. It soon became obvious to us that she had quite a few Dyslexic issues, which we had expected after speaking to her teacher. What affected me so deeply were her reactions to the exercises we had her do.

As I have said in earlier articles, I am not Dyslexic but I am very right-brained. I never had problems with words or numbers but I did have trouble with tasks that were explained unclearly and I always need the big picture explained, still do. So I wasn’t ready to experience the fear and anguish this young girl experienced doing our exercises. Anything that had to do with individual letters, the alphabet, counting numbers, copying letters were all tasks that she absolutely hated. She threw the paper on the floor and refused to do the tasks, she was polite but adamant that she couldn’t do the work. In earlier assessments I had experienced students who were a little older and had already started making their own accommodations to these learning tasks. Yes they had issues but were starting to understand some of the abstracts involved in learning their school work. This little girl was stalled, she was at a wall that she was not going to get over or around without some drastic changes in her schooling.

The co-founder of Dyslexia Victoria Online, Karen Hope, has experienced this degree of difficulty with Dyslexia with her own children. In her books she even states that some Dyslexics just don’t understand the abstractness of our language and numbers and time and directions. She says that many Dyslexic kids won’t get it till they get to the second or third grade or older. Having experienced the anguish the young girl went through I now know what that looks like. There really is no use in trying to teach abstracts like this to Dyslexic children at such an early age, at least not with the common methods being used in schools today. Where we live in Canada there is a push for literacy skills called “Success by 6”.  I’m sure it is an achievable goal for most kids but not for the ones we work with.

I know I have rambled a bit but the point I am trying to make is more of what we keep saying. These Dyslexic individuals learn differently than the majority of students. I saw how ineffective regular teaching methods were for this child. This is not a blog just about things that don’t work though because we did make progress with her during that single session.

There is a specific 14 step program Karen created for teaching Dyslexics how to spell and read using their particular learning strengths. One of the steps involves turning a word into an image that the child can visualize. It works very well and our young client responded to it almost immediately. With just a few minutes of training she was able to spell and print three age appropriate words that were impossible for her to do earlier that day using traditional methods taught at the school. We had other success with her too. She is really fortunate because the school she attends understands that students learn at different rates and we are going to work with those teachers and create teaching methods that work for her.

Go to our website and try our book “Teaching the Dyslexic Student: Spelling and Language Arts”. It contains the 14 step method and other Dyslexic appropriate teaching tools as well. Actually, these teaching methods work very well with non-Dyslexic student too.

Happy trails
Howie deGraaf

If you have questions please email me at:degraaf@dyslexiavictoria.ca

ARE DYSLEXIC CHILDREN BEING FORCED TO READ TOO EARLY?

We have found the young children around six years of age we assess for Dyslexia have a common issue. They generally have tremendous difficulty recognizing letters, numbers, words, the alphabet, counting in a correct order, printing and following instructions.  No surprise.

They generally squirm, roll their eyes, sigh and lean their heads on their hands when we pull out worksheets or manipulatives for the dreaded alphabet or numeracy exercises.   They will ask us if they could do something else, anything else.  We listen to them struggle to identify letters, guess randomly at what a word might be, and attempt to print their letters legibly.  The whole experience is excruciating and frustrating for them.

Recently I was visiting my daughter and her family in California and spent some time helping my six year old granddaughter, Isabell with her spelling and reading homework.  I don’t get many opportunities to work with kids who are successful learning to read by grade one so it was a bit of a shock.  She had been able to recite the alphabet accurately since she was about four.  Isabell could also count to one hundred and was doing well with basic arithmetic functions.  She was sounding out words, blending easily and reading out loud with fluency. Her printing was fairly neat and she was able to stay on the lines. Spelling tests were not an issue for her and she enjoyed school.  Obviously Isabell has no issues with Dyslexia.

Wow, what a difference comparing her school experience with many of the Dyslexic children we work with. We notice they don’t start to really identify and remember letters, words and numbers until about grade three.   By this time they are starting to fall seriously behind in school, becoming stressed and developing low self-esteem.  These bad feelings and their fears make it even more difficult to open up to learning because they are starting to believe they are stupid and beginning to shut down.  Compound that with “left-brained” teaching methods in their classroom they don’t understand which makes their school experience even more confusing and maddening.

Teaching Dyslexic children to read in the first grade is like trying to teach quantum physics to elementary school students.  They are not ready yet. The ability to understand abstract symbols like letters, numbers and what they represent comes at a later age for Dyslexics than other children.  Also, Dyslexic children decode words, letters and numbers with the right side of the brain instead of like the majority of the world’s population who use the language center of the left hemisphere to decode. The right hemisphere thinks in whole images not words or the parts of words so trying to decode letters, phonemes, etc. can often be useless when they are younger.

But for most Dyslexics they can learn to spell, read and work with numeracy when they are ready and with appropriate teaching methods. Maybe it would be better to focus on other skills for the first two grades and slowly introduce letters, numbers and words and in ways that make sense to them.  They could be allowed to have extensive practice printing.

Dyslexics tend to be exceptionally bright and although they may not be ready for reading they can think about complex concepts on many levels with a maturity beyond their years.  If learning to read can be adapted to their needs and delayed a little they can then apply their incredible intelligence and become successful in school and often top of their class.  Dyslexic children wouldn’t have to experience low self-esteem due to their reading and spelling skills and they would be  ready to realize their full potential.  Wow, wouldn’t that be great?

Cheers!
Karey Hope
Co-founder of DyslexiaVictoria Online

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Brad Elder – an Eloquent Dyslexic Spokesperson

Recently I was looking up some specific info for a client from our book “Assessments and Evalutions” for Dyslexics.  My mother and partner, Jan Turner put this book together outlining and detailing our methods for assessing for Dyslexia.  When I was going through the book I noticed an introduction that I had never paid attention to before.  It was an excerpt  from a Dyslexic gentleman named “Brad Elder” from one of his webpages about being Dyslexic.  I was fascinated, called Jan and asked her about him.  Jan said he and she had communicated for  awhile a few years ago about Dyslexia.  They had ideas in common and differences of opinion which she found really interesting.  She said he was a really fascinating  man to talk to in regards to Dyslexia, what it is to experience it and how to work with it.

I decided to track down his webpages and I found his home page and then other ones connected to it. I also Googled his name and found more.  I also found many commonalities in our beliefs and approaches to Dyslexia and his list of sources are helpful and his view of  the experience of  Dyslexia is very moving and enlightening for those trying to understand how it feels,  how to deal with it and to realize as Dyslexics we are not alone.

So I have quoted part of his home page and I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.  I strongly suggest you go to his other webpages and review Brad Elder’s information and sources.  Also, I am trying to find a good email address or phone number for Brad.  If anyone knows how to contact him, please let me know.  You can email me at: khope@dyslexiavictoria.ca

Thanks!
Karen Hope
Co-founder of Dyslexia Victoria Online

Brad Elder  and Dyslexia

Brad Elder and Dyslexia

So here is my tail.

Sorry but its a little cluttered.

by Brad Elder

I have left this un spell checked so that you can see my world a little better.

Like I said this is really hard to put into words.  Hard on the emotional level.  But I think it will help me to do it.  And I hope it will help you.

Ok,  where to start.  well I was diagnosed in the 6th graid.  That really helped!!!  It was the single biggest event in my life.  Suddenly there was a name for my problem.  I wasn’t lazy, or didn’t cair, or was………  what ever they called me that week.  It was like the unevers was lifted off my sholders.  I think I know what it must be like to slowly sufficate.  I don’t know really how to describe it to you but i’ll try:

Imagen that nobody could see their hands.  Everybody in the world.  Nobody can see anything from the elbo down.   Also assume that everybodys  hands work just like thay do right now today.    Now what if your hands didn’t work like “the normal hand”?   What If you didn’t have any fingers?  Everyone else can type, turn keys, scrach an ich, dress them sleves, tie there shoes, and feed them sleves.  Every one but you.  No one can see why you can’t “Do what everyone else can”.  You don’t know  why you can’t do what “normal” kids can.  You just know you can’t.   you walk and talk just like every one else.  there is no way to see an obvous reason why you can’t do it.  Adults don’t know.  How could they.  All they can see is a kid that isn’t doing what they were told to do.   And they lable you lazy, slacker, rebbel, and what ever they can come up with…….They my even point you out to your class mates and tell them not to be like you.

Rember You Have NO Idea Why You Can Not Do What The Normal Kids Do.

None.

All you know is that no matter what,  nomatter how hard you try,  you just can’t do it.   You will,  as your only choise, beleave the adults.  You must be lazy.  You must really be a slacker.  How could anyone be as worthless as you? the other kids susceed.  They must be trying.  You, there for, are not trying.

I want you to stop here and think about this senario.  Where does a Child go from here?  where does a Child go when they KNOW, becaues everyone tells them, they beleave with all there heart,  they are worthless?  Who does a Child turn to when everyone (even your parents) give up on you?

I really  want you to think hard about that.

WHAT WOULD YOU DO?   YOU HAVE NO REASON TO DOUBT WHAT ANYONE IS TELLING YOU.  YOU HAVE NO ONE TO TURN TO.  NO ONE IS TELLING YOU ANY THING POSITIVE ABOUT YOUR SELF.

This was me at ten years of age.  I wanted to die.  Not because I was depresed (though I’m shure I was) but because I was imbarsed to be alive.  I was imbarsed for my parents,  for my sisters, for my teachers.    I loved them all and respected there openions.  After all they could do what I could not.  How could anyone deserve the burden of putting up with me?

Don’t you quit!!!

How are you going to get help?  no one, not even you know the truth.  you have no fingers!!!  thats it.  Nothing sinester about your behavior.  you just don’t have any fingers!!
Your only chance will be if someone actualy sees you.  and says to them self “what a nice kid.  shurly if they could have tied their shoe thay would have.  I wonder why they don’t?”  If your luckey they will have heard of a handy cap called “nofinger” that has symptems like yours.  And they will sugest that you get testing.

To parents reading think about this.  How can a Child get help if the parents don’t want to help?  “My Kid Is Normal!”  “Not My Son!!”  “My Daughter Is Just Quiet”.  the world cann’t help unless you allow it.  I don’t know what self centered fears parents have about children,  But try and rember “a rose by anyother name would smell as sweet”.  your child is alive and suffering and is a rose by any name.  Any help you can give them will help them bloom.  Many of my friends in the LD classes I have through out my life never were alowed to sucesed because their parents refeusd th help.

Don’t you quit!! (eather of you)

Now suppose all the politics required in getting parents, teachers and famly menbers involved come togeather and you are going to get tested.
You probably won’t know or cair about whats going on.  You have spent 10 years being told and fearmly beleaving that you are just dumb and lazy.  And lord knows you have seen your shair of tests.  The test is a new fangled machane that takes a picture of your hand and can see what we can’t.  after the test you are shown the results and have them explained to you.

BINGO!!!!!
you are not lazy.  you just don’t have any fingers!!!!!!!
Of corse no one could tie there shoes if they didn’t have fingers!!!
Of corse no one could dress them selves if they didn’t have fingers!!!
Of corse no one could type if they didn’t have fingers!!!!!!!
Of corse!!!!!!!!

I hope that helps you under stand.   I finaly knew why I couldn’t tie my shoes.  There was a reason.  and it wasn’t because I was lazy!

I really got mad after that.  I was mad at all my teachers.  mad at everyone who was trusted with my life and failed!  I soon (longer for others) forgave them all as They  did’t know anymore than I that there was aproblem (execpet that they did’t lisson to me.  But who lissons to a 10 yr old who doesn’t do what he is told).  I thought that that was it!  I’d  just show the teachers “look here are my test results, look no fingers!  I can’t type.  but I can tell you the answer.”
well that didn’t happen. All, most all, of them didn’t buy it.  and a few were determind to show the class and the world that I was a faker.   My math teachers were indeferent.  They didn’t cair about it at all. and they didn’t change anything.  but at least they didn’t fight me.  a few of my english teachers realy let me have it.   I couldent rember the alphibet, (and still can’t!!) but had to sit in on recesse and after school to look up the spelling of words.

Now if you have no fingers how can you type?   how comical would it be if you were held in the class room during recess and after school because you didn’t finish or didn’t do your typing corectly?  I wasn’t laughfing then and can only find sad hummer in it now, but that was my life in the sixth grade.  Dyslexiecs generaly can’t spell or do math because we revers letters and numbers.  I still (as you can see) can’t spell. K through 12th grade and I was punished for not being able to spell through it all.  Just as if I had no fingers and was being punished for not being able to type.  The logic behind it is insane!!!  I was going to flunk remadal english in the 6th grade.  remeadial english is nothing but spelling. its the spelling class from hell.  my teacher would make me stay in from recess and after school EVERYDAY!!!!! correcting the spelling on my test.  How do you spell a unknown word?  you look it up?

For more of this entry from Brad Elder please follow this link:

Welcome to Brad (Darb) Elder’s Dyslexia page

Also Google his name Brad Elder for other pages related to him.

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Dyslexia Victoria Online’s Approach to Teaching Spelling to Dyslexics

Dyslexics Learning to SpellSpelling is the most difficult skill for the right brain but it is the most important. More time should be given to spelling and building a reading and writing vocabulary than any other learning skills.

The Dyslexia Victoria Online Approach to learning to spell is through “drawing” words and understanding them in wholes, not in their separate parts or separate letters or phonic sounds.

It provides an easy method for changing the concrete picture images formed in the right brain into letters and words (the language of the left brain) and then sending them to the left brain for use in thinking and analyzing.

Training should begin with using concrete word images that form whole pictures.  The right brain easily understands word images as it sees and understands the world in wholes: whole sentences, whole paragraphs, whole essays, whole stories, whole lessons, whole concepts and whole assignments. The right brain understands word images it can turn into pictures in the mind’s eye.

We start with learning what a concrete image is and what letters represent. Then we work with concrete words from a story that describe strong images familiar to the student such as pictures of a horse, a man, a child, a house, a barn, an animal, and object such as a table, a book, ruler, eraser, car, truck, box, etc. When the pattern of a concrete object, sound of its name and a concrete word image are understood, we move on to abstract words that are needed for putting sentences together such as  and, for, too, which, why, who because, through, under, beneath, second, third, although, however, whole, whenever, rather, everything, etc.

For more information about Dyslexia and our teaching solutions check out our website at: www.dyslexiavictoria.ca

If you have questions we would love to hear your feedback!  You can email me at:  khope@dyslexiavictoria.ca

Karey Hope deGraaf
Co-founder of Dyslexia Victoria Online

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Dyslexia Friendly Schools in the UK Benefit all Children

New Zealand 4D Dyslexia ProgramIn England they have Dyslexia Friendly schools that use teaching systems suitable for  Dyslexics and they have found that not only are the Dyslexic students doing better, the “normal”  students are achieving higher grades.  A reality check that might cause educating bodies to take a hard look at our teaching methods in general especially with literacy scores in many western countries dropping every year.

Educational programs across the world should take the possibility of dyslexic students into serious consideration. A recent US News & World Report article indicates that as many as one in five college students may suffer from some form of dyslexia. Top-notch traditional schools and the best online college programs should ensure that their curriculum is conducive to students suffering from dyslexia. Neil MacKay, an international  dyslexia consultant who has worked with the British Dyslexia Association,  Education Authorities and departments in the UK, Hong Kong and Malta has much to say about the benefits of  Dyslexia Aware and Friendly Schools.

From data collected by Neil MacKay, dyslexia-aware schools in the UK are recording improvements in arrange of measurable indicators, including attendance, attainment (measured through data), achievement(measured through assessment for learning), student and parental confidence, not just for dyslexic students,but also for a wide range of vulnerable learners.

This data, collected from schools engaged in the UK Quality Marking initiative – which recognizes schools for the quality of their inclusive practice – shows improved attendance and punctuality once teaching  styles, methods and materials are modified with a dyslexia-aware focus. This focus enables teachers to pull together a range of approaches into a coherent response, and head teachers comment that once they get it right for dyslexic students, this seems to enhance the learning of a majority of pupils in the school, with or without specific learning needs. For those with dyslexia, significant gains towards closing the learning gap have been made, with improvements recorded specifically in writing, reading, maths and science following targeted support.

Quoted from: “4D is For Dyslexia (a Guide for New Zealand Schools
www.dyslexiafoundation.org.

I strongly suggest you check out their websites and informational pdf files on their progress with getting Dyslexia Awareness Programs into the schools and recognized by the New Zealand government.  Very exciting stuff and a positive hopeful note for the future of all Dyslexics.

power to the dyslexic people“Power to the Dyslexic People”

(Okay, maybe I’m getting a little too enthusiastic.  We do need to start working together to overcome a world that doesn’t understand our special way of thinking and unlimited talents)

Cheers till next time.
Karen Hope
Co-founder of Dyslexia Victoria Online

Karen Hope- Co-founder of Dyslexia Victoria

What Is Dyslexia?

The left hemisphere thinks and expresses ideas in terms of letters, words, and numbers. It coordinates information in a computer-like fashion, giving it structure and sequence. It is linear in operation. Most importantly, it understands abstract words and ideas. It is the location in our brains where verbal language is processed and where about half of the world’s population decodes, processes and produces written language.

The right hemisphere thinks in whole concrete images and pictures.  It does not like to break down words into their phonemes (sounds of individual letters or groups of letters). These only confuse the right-brained person who thinks in whole concrete pictures. Phonetic sounds have no meaning on their own, and cannot be easily processed and stored as images in long term memory. Storing information depends on having all the parts present in a whole context such as the complete image of a printed word or a complete lesson or assignment. Through memorizing whole words the right brain understands what the words are symbols for.

Unfortunately, most of our teaching and learning depends on reading, listening and writing in abstract words and numbers that cannot be turned into whole concrete pictures. The dyslexic student learns very differently from the left brain, and so must be taught differently.

The Dyslexia Victoria Online approach to being right-brained or dyslexic offers alternative teaching methods, insights and explanations for the many learning problems classified as dyslexia. Our most important realization has led us to stop treating it as a learning disability. Our classroom and tutoring experiences, assessment and evaluation program, and our work with parents who are homeschooling their children have shown us that the right-brained student is generally very intelligent, but often held back by a number of learning differences that are overlooked by educational systems.

However, to be able to use these learning traits in the modern world predominantly right-brained persons still need to be able to spell, read, write, and work with mathematical numbers and concepts.

For more information about Dyslexia and our teaching solutions check out our website at: www.dyslexiavictoria.ca

Hope to hear from you. You can email me at: jturner@dyslexiavictoria.ca

Karey Hope
Co-founder of Dyslexia Victoria Online

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